free-apps

Here is a quick overview of some free apps and online tools that can help dyslexic students work more effectively in the classroom, doing homework, or even studying for tests.

1.  Google Play Books

[Text to Speech, Android]

This is a great app for android devices that has talk-back technology that can read books aloud to a dyslexic student. One particularly great aspect of this app is the fact that it offers synchronized highlighting, so students can read along with the speech and gain confidence in reading without getting stuck or frustrated.

2.  Dragon Dictation

[Dictation, IOS]

For years there was a focus on text to speech apps to make reading easier, however this does the opposite and allows students to record themselves speaking, and then turns their words into text. This makes writing essays and homework a lot easier.

3.  Natural Reader

[Text-to-Speech, Windows or Mac, + free online utility]

Students can choose to use an online utility, or to download free software to convert any written text such as MS Word, Webpages, PDF files, and eBook into spoken words. This online utility is great for occasional use by students, as they can copy and paste the content from web sites onto this site, which then converts it from text to speech. Dyslexic students can then either listen or read along as the text is read aloud.

4.  Cite It In

[Free online utility]

For many dyslexic students, writing a paper is harrowing enough, and adding footnotes and references just makes the experience worse. Fortunately, this website can take over the referencing part of the process, eliminating one of their stressful tasks.

5. Pocket

[Organizer -IOS / Android / Chrome / Firefox]

Pocket is a free service that allows students to save web site articles to one location, and retrieve it later from any device.  It includes text-to-speech functionality, making it accessible for everyone. This can help students more easily manage research projects or other assignments, such as keeping track of news articles and current affairs for a politics or critical thinking class.

6.  Whisper Sync

[Text to Speech / Amazon Kindle Devices & Apps]

This is a free app offered by Amazon that can convert Kindle books into audio files. One of the best aspects of this is that you can jump in and out of the audio elements, so a student can try reading themselves, and then if they get tired or frustrated, they can listen for a while, and then go back to reading.

7. Ginger

[Writing App – All Platforms]

Ginger is one of the most popular writing apps out there, and it really does help students improve their writing as they go by picking up on their mistakes and errors as they go, allowing them to make changes while they’re writing. Features include grammar and spell check, word prediction, built-in-dictionary, translation, and text-to-speech. 

8. Gboard – the Google Keyboard

[Enhanced keyboard – Android]

This free app adds search functionality and other features, including dictation and word prediction, to the device keyboard. The search tools eliminate the need to copy or paste when sending an email.  

9. Mind Meister

[Mind-map creator, Android / IOS]

This is another great study tool that can also help with note taking. As many dyslexic students don’t find pages of text appealing, this allows them to format their own notes in much more user-friendly formats that can make learning and revising a whole lot more efficient.

 

Sharon ConwellAppsPunctuation & GrammarSoftwareSpellingSupport & AcccommodationsTechnology
Here is a quick overview of some free apps and online tools that can help dyslexic students work more effectively in the classroom, doing homework, or even studying for tests. 1.  Google Play Books This is a great app for android devices that has talk-back technology that can read books aloud...